Archive for obama

Tell President Obama that solar is ready!

By Rhone Resch, SEIA President and CEO

Yesterday, in his inaugural address, President Obama vowed to fight climate change and called for strengthening the clean energy economy.

“We, the people, still believe that our obligations as Americans are not just to ourselves, but to all posterity. We will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations.

Some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires, and crippling drought, and more powerful storms. The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition; we must lead it.

–President Barack Obama, January 21, 2013

Today, the solar industry employs more than 100,000 Americans at 5,600 companies, mostly small businesses, across all 50 states – this is more than double the number working in solar in 2009.  By nearly all measures, the solar energy industry has been one of the fastest growing industries over the last 5 years and we expect a record 2012 for installed solar capacity, despite a slow economic recovery.

We need all the people who support the industry to join us. Please take a moment and forward this email to 5 of your friends. They can join here.

The President can help lead the way to making a stronger solar industry. The new 113th U.S. Congress must also work together to make this become a reality. We need to maintain the ITC so that solar can compete on a level playing field with other energy sources. We need to streamline the permitting process and cut red tape for small businesses and homeowners. We need to defend net metering policies across the nation.

We need to tell policymakers that the solar industry is ready to lead. Heck, we’ve been ready.

We have a commitment to the generation that will build our future. Let’s make sure it’s one with a stable climate and clean, reliable energy sources.

Join us as we work to make sure this administration knows that the next four years is crucial to success of the solar industry. We need the President’s leadership to make that happen. We need Congress to work together to pass sensible policy. Most of all, we need your help us take a stand.

Tell your friends to join our advocacy list and get involved.

Sincerely,

Rhone

Rhone Resch, SEIA President and CEO

Spain suspends FITs

28. January 2012 | Top News, Applications & Installations, Industry & Suppliers, Global PV markets, Markets & Trends | By:  Oliver Ristau

In a surprise move, the Spanish Council of ministers has implemented a temporary suspension of the renewable energy feed-in-tariffs (FIT) for new installations in Spain.

Spanish flag

No further renewable energy projects, which includes photovoltaics, will receive FITs.

Solarpack

As a reaction to the financial crisis in the Mediterranean country, the new Spanish government, under Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, has approved a new law, by which the current system of remuneration for renewable energies will be discontinued.

As the Council of Ministers announced on Friday, the government won’t give any economic incentive to fund new renewable installations, and the relevant administrative and funding systems will be suspended.

While it was said that the suspension will be temporary, the government did not disclose any timeframe for when the FITs may be resumed.

In a statement released, it argued that “to maintain the current system of remuneration is incompatible to the current economic crisis.” It did stress, however, that the new measures will not be retroactive. They won’t effect “either the installations in operation, or those that are already registered.”

The Solar Sell-off Has Gotten Ridiculous

By Travis Hoium

Solar stocks took another drubbing yesterday, this time on word that Italy’s debt had been downgraded by S&P. If it isn’t changes to a feed-in tariff, it’s economic concerns, or falling oil prices, and now … it’s debt ratings?

The downgrade and solar
Does the Italy downgrade really have anything to do with solar stocks? Ratepayers essentially pay for feed-in tariffs, and Italy’s government finances have little to do with solar, save for setting policy and providing other incentives. And with sustainable changes made to the feed-in tariff earlier this year, I think it is unlikely additional changes will be made soon.

There’s also the fact that solar is one of the few things Italy can point to as a success right now. One of the reason Italy’s debt was downgraded was the prospect of stagnant growth, something the solar industry can help improve.

So while a downgrade of Italy’s debt isn’t good news, don’t you think the market has taken it a little too far this time?

Case of the falling euro
One of the bigger problems for solar manufacturers is a constantly falling euro. That is a concern for China overall, because the EU is a major trade partner with China and is one of the biggest buyers of solar panels from Chinese manufacturers.

That’s one of the reasons we’ve heard about China possibly buying the debt of troubled EU members in recent weeks. If European countries begin to default on their debt and the euro falls, then China will be affected too. China doesn’t want that to happen.

Problems in Europe overshadow solar’s growth everywhere else
Investors are quick to panic over concerns about solar’s demand, but they’re also typically slow to realize where new demand will come from. In 2008, when Spain was a major demand market and feed-in tariffs collapsed from overinstallation, everyone panicked. But Germany and Italy picked up the slack, and 2010 was a record year for the industry.

We will likely see a similar progression, with Germany and Italy becoming slightly smaller but more consistent demand sources within the next year, based on updated feed-in tariff plans. In addition, Japan, China, India, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the U.S. are also growing demand sources. In particular, China and the U.S. have a lot of capacity to build solar plants, and with costs falling, the economics play into solar developers’ hands.

Are all of these companies going bankrupt?
Yesterday a friend asked me, “How long is the solar panic of 2011 gonna last? … These companies are priced like they’re going out of business.” While I don’t have the answer to when the market will see value in solar stocks, I can point to fundamentals that investors increasingly should be considering. Value investors often look at price/book value as a way to gauge a stock’s value. A price/book value less than 1 indicates that a stock may be a good value, while growth stocks typically trade above a ratio of 1.

Obama Calls for 80% “Clean Energy” by 2035


Washington, DC, USA — In an unprecedented move U.S. President Barack Obama put clean energy front and center on the agenda of the American government — calling for an 80% clean energy target by 2035.

In his yearly State of the Union address to the nation’s lawmakers, Obama said that it is time for America to invest in the energy of the future and stop supporting the energy of the past.  He called on Congress to remove all subsidies for fossil fuels and to reinvest the money saved into clean energy initiatives.

The President said that he hopes America can obtain 80% of its energy from clean sources by 2035, the most aggressive target ever set forth by a president.  While renewable energy supporters were thrilled with the bold target, they were reminded during the speech that Obama’s idea of clean energy is broad: His target includes nuclear energy, clean coal and natural gas, in addition to traditional renewables like wind, solar, biomass, geothermal and hydro.

“Some folks want wind and solar. Others want nuclear, clean coal, and natural gas,” he said. “To meet this goal, we will need them all – and I urge Democrats and Republicans to work together to make it happen.”